Retro Lounge Garage

Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Zahzoo » Sun Jan 26, 2014 9:53 pm

65 & sunny here today... Finally got that damn tail-gate latch fixed on my Avalanche!! I installed a non-OEM latch assembly a few weeks ago after I broke the handle off during our last fucking ice storm when my tail gate was frozen shut with 3 inches of ice on the bed cover.

Funny story... my wife wanted a new treadmill for Christmas so I found a killer deal on one on-line. Free shipping... which was a good thing the fucker weighed 325 lbs... they shipped it standard freight which I didn't know meant they threw it on an 18 wheeler headin up here into the Ozarks.

The truck driver used GPS to find my street but was smart enough to call first and ask if he could get a double sleeper Peterbilt with a 48 ft tandem axle trailer up to my house... I laughed and said if it's not a low-boy trailer like moving vans he might make it up my road... BUT... the only problem is he couldn't turn it around once he got it up here. The road to my house has a 14% grade with a hairpin turn at 17% grade... with a 12% up to my house... about a lane and quarter wide.

Anyways I ended up meeting him down the hill at the Baptist church parking lot... after my latch handle broke I backed my truck right up to his trailer and we slid the treadmill onto my bed cover... I used 4 boat tie-downs and ratcheted that sucker down and hauled it up the hill... The trucker driver was from New Jersey... he told me he's always impressed with us down in the south... we'll haul anything tied down to any piece of shit anywhere... I just smiled and said... Hey improvise and get by... nothing has to be fancy round here...

So anyways back to my damn tail gate latch... they gots these metal bars with threaded ends that attach to the gate mechanism. The threaded ends fit into these little plastic threaded compression clamp some bitches that grip the ends of each side release. It all worked fine for a couple of weeks... but then the left side kept slipping and hanging up... So this meant 30 minutes of mucking with it, try this... try that... first Blue Lock-tight... Nope that didn't cut it... So finally I ended up using Red Lock-Tight and a zip-tie on both ends... Of course once I got the left side behaving... the right side decided to slip.

What I don't get... everything on the whole mechanism is good solid steel... except the handle which gets the most stressful use and the little connectors on the activator bars... all are cheap assed plastic!! Every stress point is a point of failure on the damn thing!! The handle would have meant a 3-piece assembly or a simple die-cast pot metal thing and in using plastic they probably saved... $1.50. The other connectors could have been simple drilled metal cylinders with a threaded lock screw...

What pisses me off... I never went to school and got an engineering degree but the way this is designed is actually kinda cool... but the main stress points are the weakest links... Whoever designed it gets an "F" from me...

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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Sun Jan 26, 2014 10:09 pm

It was probably designed on an animated CAD program. They got the computer model working and then sent it to production to be manufactured. The bean counters saw they could save money making the linkages out of molded plastic. Nobody bothered to field test shit I bet. It's not like those old Volkswagen ads in the 70's where they show the VW engineers testing each little part under the most inhospitable conditions to see how they hold up.

http://youtu.be/f-qc7BzZTbw
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Zahzoo » Sun Jan 26, 2014 10:51 pm

Well actually it worked great for 8 years... which ain't bad as cars go. But to me... it's a truck. The wheels should fall off before the tailgate latch breaks...
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Mon Jan 27, 2014 1:11 am

The new trucks are going to have aluminum frames. I think it's to meet the higher EPA standards. It will be interesting to see how they hold up and when you are towing something big, a light truck isn't what you want. Maybe it's just the half tons that are going to be aluminum.

Mechanics I know are complaining about the plastic parts on cars. Especially engine parts. 8 years of expanding and contacting breaks the plastic and the parts fail. Some things should just be made of metal period. If they are going to make cars that only hold up for ten years, we should see a drastic price reduction.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Zahzoo » Mon Jan 27, 2014 11:56 am

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For hot rodders, no prewar platform is more sought-after than the 'Deuce Coupe'—Ford's two-door 1932 5-Window phenomenon. Trouble is, after 82 years, getting your mitts on one (much less an example worth building around) can be challenging even for the avid scrapyard dog. Fortuitously, the fine folks from Dearborn have announced that the hotrod icon is officially returning: New 1932 Ford 5-Window Coupe body shells will now be available through the Blue Oval's Component Sales arm.

According to Ford, these '32 Coupe reproductions are exclusively licensed to United Pacific Industries, which rolled out a flawless 5-Window replica at SEMA 2013. Each shell is stamped from virgin metal, then welded and assembled using modern manufacturing techniques. This, along with supplementary rustproofing, keeps the new Deuces from warping and wearing as the decades roll past—ideal for builders, though we do love a good 5-Window rat rod. Each part comes with an official Blue Oval tag.

Ford doesn't have its own prices for the '32 5-Window body up yet, but you can expect to pay around $20,000 for a steel United Pacific Industries shell. Of course, you'll still need a decent frame to build off of, plus a 327-cid small-block should you want to relive all those John Milner American Graffiti fantasies.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby DONNIEP » Mon Jan 27, 2014 12:12 pm

20 grand isn't bad for a steel body. Of course, a fiberglass body is a hell of a lot cheaper. But there's still a stigma attached to fiberglass bodied hot rods in lots of circles. You'll even hear it talked about at the Barrett Jackson auction when a fiberglassed hot rod crosses the block. It's especially evident when a Cobra replica comes up for sale. Never mind that the majority of Cobra reps now are miles and away better than the cars Shelby built back in the day. And the fact that the fiberglass bodies are extremely durable and much easier to repair.

Anyways, I think it's about time the big three start making these classic bodies again. GM has been doing it for a while with the Camaro. And when they're done they can bring almost as much as the real thing - depending on who does the building.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:54 pm

zahzoo wrote:Image



For hot rodders, no prewar platform is more sought-after than the 'Deuce Coupe'—Ford's two-door 1932 5-Window phenomenon. Trouble is, after 82 years, getting your mitts on one (much less an example worth building around) can be challenging even for the avid scrapyard dog. Fortuitously, the fine folks from Dearborn have announced that the hotrod icon is officially returning: New 1932 Ford 5-Window Coupe body shells will now be available through the Blue Oval's Component Sales arm.

According to Ford, these '32 Coupe reproductions are exclusively licensed to United Pacific Industries, which rolled out a flawless 5-Window replica at SEMA 2013. Each shell is stamped from virgin metal, then welded and assembled using modern manufacturing techniques. This, along with supplementary rustproofing, keeps the new Deuces from warping and wearing as the decades roll past—ideal for builders, though we do love a good 5-Window rat rod. Each part comes with an official Blue Oval tag.

Ford doesn't have its own prices for the '32 5-Window body up yet, but you can expect to pay around $20,000 for a steel United Pacific Industries shell. Of course, you'll still need a decent frame to build off of, plus a 327-cid small-block should you want to relive all those John Milner American Graffiti fantasies.


My dad collected old Ford's. He had a 32 Model B in pretty good original condition. Finding good frames was always a problem. After the car was shot, people would turn the frames into wagons and really load them up and bend the frame. I wonder if they had a good set of original dies or if they had to make some. You can get new frames. What's funny is people turned old Fords into hot rods originally because they didn't have any money. Now you have to have a pretty good disposable income to afford a hot rod.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:58 pm

DONNIEP wrote:20 grand isn't bad for a steel body. Of course, a fiberglass body is a hell of a lot cheaper. But there's still a stigma attached to fiberglass bodied hot rods in lots of circles. You'll even hear it talked about at the Barrett Jackson auction when a fiberglassed hot rod crosses the block. It's especially evident when a Cobra replica comes up for sale. Never mind that the majority of Cobra reps now are miles and away better than the cars Shelby built back in the day. And the fact that the fiberglass bodies are extremely durable and much easier to repair.

Anyways, I think it's about time the big three start making these classic bodies again. GM has been doing it for a while with the Camaro. And when they're done they can bring almost as much as the real thing - depending on who does the building.


Oh they would make all sorts of cool cars but they have to deal with government regulations. They have to pass a crash test. Some of the older car designs just won't pass. I would love to see air cooled cars come back. They can't meet current emissions so unless we have a constitutional convention and get rid of the current federal government (which I fully support) it ain't going to happen.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:01 pm

DONNIEP wrote:20 grand isn't bad for a steel body. Of course, a fiberglass body is a hell of a lot cheaper. But there's still a stigma attached to fiberglass bodied hot rods in lots of circles. You'll even hear it talked about at the Barrett Jackson auction when a fiberglassed hot rod crosses the block. It's especially evident when a Cobra replica comes up for sale. Never mind that the majority of Cobra reps now are miles and away better than the cars Shelby built back in the day. And the fact that the fiberglass bodies are extremely durable and much easier to repair.

Anyways, I think it's about time the big three start making these classic bodies again. GM has been doing it for a while with the Camaro. And when they're done they can bring almost as much as the real thing - depending on who does the building.


Well if fiberglass is of no value let's drop the Corvette prices why don't we.
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Re: Retro Lounge Garage

Postby DONNIEP » Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:21 pm

See that's just the thing. A lot of hot rodders are car snobs. Basically if you don't spend a ton of money patching up a POS rusted out body then you don't belong in the club. And they look down on kit cars too. Now the kit car thing I can understand, to a point. The industry didn't really get its act together until the 90s. But the kits you can buy today are, for the most part, no different than the hot rod that Joe Blow can go buy at one of the hot rod shops around the country. Most of those aren't all original anyway so there's really no difference except most kits package most of what you need so you get it all at one time. But there's still that prejudice against fiberglass bodies. And really, a large percentage of kits are sold now as turn-key minus. Meaning they're completely built and finished, minus the engine and trans. And, of course, most manufacturers have a string of authorized dealers that'll slap any engine and trans in the thing and you're done.
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