Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Play Time!

Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Izzy Moreno » Wed Jul 30, 2014 5:19 am



Since you fags like your shinies so much...

Cheers! :beers:
Big time playa.
User avatar
Izzy Moreno
Swinger
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:10 am
Has thanked: 45 times
Been thanked: 37 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Zahzoo » Wed Jul 30, 2014 8:44 am

I did some circuit board assembly in the late 70's in Silicon Valley... no where near as intricate as watch making. I found it tedious as hell... So I worked my ass off to get promoted so I wouldn't have to fidget around with tiny parts and soldering irons anymore!!!
User avatar
Zahzoo
Minister of Mayhem
 
Posts: 2043
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: 3rd Stone From the Sun
Has thanked: 110 times
Been thanked: 69 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby DONNIEP » Wed Jul 30, 2014 11:00 am

They make beautiful watches, pricey too. And as much as I love watches and movements, I hate open case back watches. Just can't stand them for some odd reason. I wish I knew how to work on watches, but my hands and eyes aren't what they used to be. When I went to pick up my Seiko diver after it was serviced, I got to go back into the watchsmith's little room and it was like heaven. He wasn't there but his wife was and she let me look around. Of course the first thing I see is an old, and I mean really old, two tone Datejust laying in pieces. He had the movement out to work on it and I picked up the watch head and bracelet and you would not have believed the shape it was in. I mean this fucker looked like it had been in a blender. And the jube was so stretched out it wasn't even funny. I mentioned that to her and she said her husband was trying to find a nicer bracelet for the owner and when I told her they could get that one restored for about 200 bucks she was shocked. Anyway, I love watches. Just wish I knew how to work on them.
User avatar
DONNIEP
Chairman of the Board
 
Posts: 3964
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:17 pm
Has thanked: 124 times
Been thanked: 95 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:46 pm

Zahzoo wrote:I did some circuit board assembly in the late 70's in Silicon Valley... no where near as intricate as watch making. I found it tedious as hell... So I worked my ass off to get promoted so I wouldn't have to fidget around with tiny parts and soldering irons anymore!!!


I did a bit of that as well. I went from one extreme to the other. Working construction and rolling in the dirt to working in a clean room. Both were a pain in the ass. Ah it those kind of jobs that motivate you to finish college.
Mr. Fantastic
Headliner
 
Posts: 1739
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:54 pm
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:52 pm

I'm amazed at how reliable watch movements are considering how small and flimbsy the gears are. I found a Swiss trained watch repairman not too far from here. You need to have the movements oiled every so often.
Mr. Fantastic
Headliner
 
Posts: 1739
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:54 pm
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Johann Shmidt » Thu Aug 14, 2014 5:05 pm

I used to pick up stuff from an old Swiss dude who made small run precision parts not far from where I live now when I was working for a heat treating company. He also made one of a kind replacement parts to repair high dollar antique watches too. He had a handle bar mustache and really thick glasses. His name was Zeigfried. They called him Ziggy. Looked and talked just like an actor would playing the part of an old Swiss watchmaker. Drove a Jaguar.
Johann Shmidt
Headliner
 
Posts: 1380
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 8:12 pm
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 105 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Sun Aug 17, 2014 10:20 pm

You guys were heat treating the watch parts? I worked for a gun dealer and gun smith when I was in high school. He used to do case hardening and head treating in the shop. If it was something critical like a bolt face or receiver he didn't mess with it. He sent those parts out to a professional heat treating outfit in Salt Lake City. They were supposed to be one of the best in the country.
Mr. Fantastic
Headliner
 
Posts: 1739
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:54 pm
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Johann Shmidt » Mon Aug 18, 2014 1:20 pm

Most of the parts they manufactured that we heat treated were for aircraft. They could have heat treated them themselves but a lot of buyers require certification for everything and most machine shops don't have a licensed metal metallurgist to do that. Plus most vendors like to spread the liability around when they manufacture parts so they can spread the blame around when something goes wrong.
Johann Shmidt
Headliner
 
Posts: 1380
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2014 8:12 pm
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 105 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby DONNIEP » Thu Aug 21, 2014 8:22 pm

Johann Shmidt wrote:I used to pick up stuff from an old Swiss dude who made small run precision parts not far from where I live now when I was working for a heat treating company. He also made one of a kind replacement parts to repair high dollar antique watches too. He had a handle bar mustache and really thick glasses. His name was Zeigfried. They called him Ziggy. Looked and talked just like an actor would playing the part of an old Swiss watchmaker. Drove a Jaguar.


That's a great story!!
User avatar
DONNIEP
Chairman of the Board
 
Posts: 3964
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 8:17 pm
Has thanked: 124 times
Been thanked: 95 times

Re: Look over the watchmakers' shoulders

Postby Mr. Fantastic » Fri Aug 22, 2014 12:48 am

Johann Shmidt wrote:Most of the parts they manufactured that we heat treated were for aircraft. They could have heat treated them themselves but a lot of buyers require certification for everything and most machine shops don't have a licensed metal metallurgist to do that. Plus most vendors like to spread the liability around when they manufacture parts so they can spread the blame around when something goes wrong.


The gunsmith I worked with was old school. He said taking mild steel and case hardening it would make more durable working parts than some of the new alloys. He was proven right. A lot of the new guns have new alloys in the parts and when they go through heavy use the parts fail. With mild steel it's flexible but you can case harden the surface so it doesn't wear. If done right it's very durable.
Mr. Fantastic
Headliner
 
Posts: 1739
Joined: Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:54 pm
Has thanked: 11 times
Been thanked: 65 times

Next

Return to Gadgets & Games

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron